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BOARDS AND COMMITTEES

They are volunteers, too!
Look here for information and the latest techniques to develop your board or committee. The purpose is to help those who work or serve on nonprofit boards of directors or committees.

~January 2014~

cartoon figures around a table

ESTABLISHING A COMMITTEE

Is a committee the way to go?  Never leap to forming a committee before asking yourself these questions:

  • What is the purpose?
  • What does it look like if you accomplish the project
  • Can it be accomplished by one or two people?
  • Is there an obvious and skilled leader available?
  • What is the “climate” in your organization about using committees to accomplish things?

Write that purpose down.


Create an enthusiastic and clear purpose statement.   The committee needs focus to be successful.


Select the right members


Make a list of every volunteer who is interested in the project described in the purpose statement.  Then list the “go-getters.”  Those people who always get things done.  Match people to form the Committee; experience, skills, follow-through, ability to play “nice” with others, reliable, problem solvers data people, idea people, and those who will be the “closers.”   Members should be carefully selected.  Create a diverse group without being incompatible.  Recruit people with different perspectives.
When asking people to participate tell them you expect openness to new ideas and other people’s opinions.  Impress on the person how the purpose is accomplished through a process of give and take in open discussion.

A well informed leader


The leader of a committee must realize that the success or failure of that committee rests squarely on his/her shoulders. The primary duty of the leader is to guide the group’s discussions. He/she should encourage every member to participate in the meetings and keep the discussion focused on the matter at hand. Meetings should start and end as scheduled and the agenda should be followed.
The leader is also responsible for encouraging opportunities for interactions between the members. Committee members should be provided the opportunity to get to know each other. Groups tend to work better if the members are familiar with one another. If members don’t get along well, the leader must not allow those members to impede the flow of the meeting. A quick solution is not to allow the conflicting people to sit near each other or in the direct line of fire.
Committees are an integral part of every successful organization. A committee with a clear purpose, a well-informed leader and dedicated members is on its way toward success.

Committees are an integral part of every successful organization. A committee with a clear purpose, a well-informed leader and dedicated members is on its way toward success.

cartoon characters around a table
Good luck!

 


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